Overview of TIB Grant Programs

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he Legislature created the Transportation Improvement Board to foster state investment in quality local transportation projects. The TIB distributes grant funding, which comes from the revenue generated by three cents of the statewide gas tax, to cities and counties for funding transportation projects. TIB's grant programs are catagorized by the type of customer agency each program is intended to serve.

Application Process

TIB typically issues a call for projects each June for the next year's funding program. The TIB application process follows these steps:

  • Decide which TIB Funding programs your agency is eligible for.
  • Download the appropriate funding application and complete a separate application for each project you want to be considered for funding. Funding applications are made available in June.
  • Submit/postmark your application by the application due date - typically near the end of August.
  • TIB engineering staff will begin reviewing and scoring all applications in September. TIB uses a priority array process for each funding program to identify projects that best meet the intent of the program. Criteria are developed by the Board in cooperation with local agencies.
  • TIB staff present a list of recommended projects to the board at the November meeting.
  • If your project is selected, you will be contacted by TIB engineering staff about what steps to take next.

TIB Funding Workshops

During the call for projects, TIB engineering staff conduct funding program workshops at various locations throughout the state. The TIB funding workshops provide information about the funding programs TIB administers, the scoring criteria for each program and the application process. TIB's workshops are intended to increase the probability of a successful project application. For more information on workshops or to register, see the TIB Training page.

Call for Projects

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IB typically issues a call for projects each June with new projects being awarded in November. The most recent call for projects, for award in December 2022, opens on June 1, 2022. TIB anticipates opening a call for projects on June 1st, 2022, for award in November 2022. More information will be available after the May 2022 board meeting. This year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, TIB will be holding funding workshops as webinars on June 1, 2021 and June 9, 2021. Project selections will be announced at the December 2022 TIB meeting. For more information about TIB Funding Workshops, visit the TIB Training page.

2022 Call for Projects - Anticipated Program Sizes
Urban Arterial Program/
Arterial Preservation Program
$82.0 Million
Urban Active Transportation Program $8.0 Million
Small City Arterial Program/
Small City Preservation Program/
Small City Maintenance Program
$27.0 Million
Small City Active Transportation Program $5.0 Million
2022 Call for Projects - Schedule
Preliminary call size presented to board May 20, 2022
Applications posted online June 1, 2022
Online Funding Workshops May 31 - June 9, 2022
Grant applications due August 19, 2022
Staff recommendation presented to the board December 1, 2022
Recommended adoption of new projects December 2, 2022

November 2021 Project Selections

At the November 19, 2021 Board meeting, the Transportation Improvement Board selected projects for the FY 2023 funding cycle.
A summary of the projects funded is below.  For more details, view the new project selections on the TIB Performance Management Dashboard.

Program Total Funding # Selected Applications Total Requested Total Project Costs
UAP $64,899,784 30 75 $160,464,031 $356,266,221
SP $5,427,739 19 30 $10,467,771 $29,303,849
APP $6,114,170 16 28 $12,727,859 $15,191,762
SCAP $15,279,995 24 46 $27,575,699 $37,114,828
SCSP $2,965,411 13 37 $10,038,327 $10,678,630
SCPP $4,110,198 27 56 $11,194,878 $11,695,198

More information on Project Selections

For detailed information on project selections, view the Project Selections section of the TIB Performance Dashboard.

Urban Programs

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he Transportation Improvement Board provides funding to cities with a population of 5,000 or more and counties with urban unincorporated areas through three grant programs: the Urban Arterial Program (UAP), the Active Transportation Program (ATP), and the Arterial Preservation Program (APP). Eligible projects must be located within the federally designated urban area and be in compliance with the Growth Management Act. Projects are selected annually on a competitive basis.

Urban Arterial Program (UAP)

Overview

The Urban Arterial Program funds projects in one of the following bands: Safety, Commercial Growth and Development, Mobility, and Physical Condition.

A maximum of 65 points may be achieved in any one band; the remaining 35 points come from both Sustainability and Constructability criteria.

Program Specific Information
  • Eligible agencies are counties with urban unincorporated areas and cities with a population of 5,000 or greater
  • Eligible projects must be on a federally classified route (principal, minor, collector)
  • Projects must be consistent with state, regional and local transportation plans
  • The local match requirement is determined by the city's valuation, or in the case of counties, by its road levy valuation (Minimum local match ranges from 10 to 20 percent)
  • Funds are distributed across five regions based on arterial lane miles and population

Urban Active Transportation Program (ATP)

Overview

The Active Transportation Program provides funding to improve pedestrian and cyclist safety, enhanced pedestrian and cyclist mobility and connectivity, or improve the condition of existing facilities.

All projects must be transportation related on a federally classified route (principal, minor, collector).

Program Specific Information
  • Eligible agencies are counties with urban unincorporated areas and cities with a population of 5,000 or greater
  • Eligible projects must be on a federally classified route (principal, minor, collector)
  • Projects must be consistent with state, regional and local transportation plans
  • The local match requirement is determined by the city's valuation, or in the case of counties, by its road levy valuation (Minimum local match ranges from 10 to 20 percent)
  • Funds are distributed across three regions based on arterial lane miles and population

Arterial Preservation Program (APP)

Overview

The Arterial Preservation Program (APP) provides funding for overlay of federally classified arterial streets (principal, minor) in cities with a population greater than 5,000 and assessed valuation less than $3 billion. Although the program offers critical preservation assistance, it is not enough to substitute for a city's street maintenance program. Therefore, the program is limited to overlay to defray high-cost preservation projects, allowing cities to concentrate limited resources on lower cost preventative maintenance.

Program Specific Information
  • Rather than a regional distribution, funding is targeted for road maintenance opportunities across the state
  • Local match for TIB funding is based upon a city's assessed valuation (AV). Cities with AV of less than $1 billion are required to match 10%; cities with AV between $1 billion and $3 billion are required to match 15%

APP Required Match

To determine the matching percentage required for your city, select from the list below:

Relight Washington Program (LED)

Overview

The main goal of the Relight Washington Program is to lower city's street light costs by helping cities convert to more energy efficient LED streetlights.

A challenge in converting to LED streetlights is the initial capital costs. The TIB decided it would pay the initial capital costs.

Program Specific Information
  • Eligible cities include all small towns (population less than 5,000) and urban cities with a total assessed value of less than $2 billion. Contact your Region Engineer to confirm eligibility.
  • Cities with their own streetlights or municipal energy departments can request funding by submitting a proposal to TIB.
  • Private streetlights, including HOAs are not eligible unless the utility is willing to take them over.
  • For more information contact your TIB engineer

Small City Programs

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he Transportation Improvement Board provides funding for cities and towns with a population less than 5,000 through four grant programs: the Small City Arterial Program (SCAP), the Active Transportation (ATP) Program, the Small City Preservation Program (SCPP) and the Relight Washington Program (LED). These programs fund projects with the intent of providing suitable transportation infrastructure. The Transportation Improvement Board understands that the state's smaller communities do not have the financial ability to fund large transportation improvements; therefore, TIB's programs have been developed to require little or no local match.

Small City Arterial Program (SCAP)

Overview

The Small City Arterial Program Projects that preserve, rehabilitate, or reconstruct TIB classified arterials consistent with local needs in incorporated cities and towns with a population less than 5,000.

Program Specific Information

Required match for this program is based on assessed value as follows:

  • 10% match for cities over $500 million
  • 5% match for cities over $100 million
  • No match is requested for valuations under $100 million

Small City Active Transportation Program (ATP)

Overview

The Active Transportation Program provides funding to improve pedestrian and cyclist safety, enhanced pedestrian and cyclist mobility and connectivity, or improve the condition of existing facilities.

Program Specific Information

The intent of the project must be transportation and not recreation.

Required match for this program is based on assessed value as follows:

  • 10% match for cities over $500 million
  • 5% match for cities over $100 million
  • No match is requested for valuations under $100 million

Small City Preservation Program (SCPP)

Overview

This program provides funding for chip seal and overlay of existing pavement and sidewalk maintenance in incorporated cities and towns with populations less than 5,000.

Program Specific Information

Funds are not distributed regionally, rather, funding is targeted for road maintenance opportunities across the state.

Condition ratings, economies of scale, and assessed valuation of cities are all considerations in amount of funds provided.

Required match for this program is based on assessed value as follows:

  • 10% match for cities over $500 million
  • 5% match for cities over $100 million
  • No match is requested for valuations under $100 million

SCPP Required Match

To determine the matching percentage required for your city, select from the list below:

Relight Washington Program (LED)

Overview

The main goal of the Relight Washington Program is to lower city's street light costs by helping cities convert to more energy efficient LED streetlights.

A challenge in converting to LED streetlights is the initial capital costs. The TIB decided it would pay the initial capital costs.

Program Specific Information
  • Eligible cities include all small towns (population less than 5,000) and urban cities with a total assessed value of less than $2 billion. Contact your Region Engineer to confirm eligibility.
  • Cities with their own streetlights or municipal energy departments can request funding by submitting a proposal to TIB.
  • Private streetlights, including HOAs are not eligible unless the utility is willing to take them over.
  • For more information contact your TIB engineer.

Small City Maintenance Program (SCMP)

Overview

TIB offers grants to our small city agencies for low-cost maintenance. This includes treatments such as crack sealing, pothole repair, pavement repair, fog sealing, and more. Agencies should apply for what is needed to maximize the lifespan of their streets.

This program is meant to supplement current city efforts towards maintenance or encourage cities to start regular maintenance. Cities should administer the projects on their own. Consultant and engineering costs are not eligible.

Program Specific Information
  • Apply treatment only on hard surfaced city streets.
  • State Routes are not eligible, even if they are within town/city limits.
  • Target fewer bid items with higher quantity (city-wide) type work for better economy of scale.
  • Federal funding cannot be used for local match.
  • Engineering costs are not eligible.

For more information contact your TIB engineer.

Other Funding Opportunities

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he Transportation Improvement Board occasionally offers funding opportunities with specialized eligiblity requirements in addition to its regular grant funding programs for Urban and Small City customers.

Complete Streets Award (CS)

Overview

The Complete Streets Award is a funding opportunity for local governments that have an adopted complete streets ordinance. Board approved nominators may nominate an agency for showing practice of planning and building streets to accommodate all users, including pedestrians, access to transit, cyclists, and motorists of all ages and abilities.

Agencies with an adopted complete streets ordinance should confirm their eligibility on the TIB eligibility list and maintain close relationships with the approved nominators listed below.

Next Opportunity

It is anticipated the next Complete Streets awards will be in 2023 or 2024.

Nominators - State Agency Partners

Eligible agencies may be nominated by any of the established nominating partners. Nominating partners include board approved state agencies and non-profit organizations that have an interest in transportation or complete streets. Current approved state agency nominators include:

Nominators - Non-Profit Organizations

Eligible agencies may be nominated by any of the established nominating partners. Nominating partners include board approved state agencies and non-profit organizations that have an interest in transportation or complete streets. Current approved non-profit nominators include:

Program Specific Information

How to Nominate

Nominating agencies will fill out a simple 2-page form describing what motivates a nominator to nominate a city for an award. Nominators may describe activities or projects that indicate an ethic of building complete streets. Examples include: non-motorized master plans, current projects that accommodate non-motorized users, or future projects that retrofit streets and roads to include more users.

What Should Agencies Do?

Cities and counties should have an adopted complete streets policy and show an ethic of building for all users. Many agencies have been doing this without an official policy and these activities may be considered during nomination and evaluation by TIB staff. TIB encourages working with nominating organizations, especially during design and development of projects to ensure nomination.

Who is Awarded?

TIB staff will evaluate all nominations to determine who will receive awards. Unlike other TIB programs, there will not be set criteria established. TIB staff will evaluate based on policy quality, plan integration, community outreach and engagement, past project actions, and future project plans.

How Can Funds be Used?

Nominated agencies will submit a work program to TIB. Immediately after board approval of the city's or county's proposed work plan, TIB will disburse funds to the city or county. The city or county will hold the funds in a restricted account to be used only on activities in the approved work plan. TIB staff can approve work plan amendments administratively. Cities and counties must expend funds within three years of payment or the funds will be recovered by TIB.